Rumble Foreskin

A properly cleaned and lubricated chain is CRITICAL to bike performance. It is probably the most often overlooked and neglected part of the bike and yet is so critical to the riding experience. Chain drives require a lot of maintenance! Other drive types need little or no maintenance, like shaft or belt-drive, but chain drive provides huge weight savings, efficiency, and toughness that these other drives can't match, but ONLY if the chain and sprockets are properly maintained. Improperly maintained, dirty, dry, and worn chain drives can lead to poor fuel economy, excessive noise, vibration, lack of power, and can result in your being left stranded on a dark desert highway when they fail. Follow this chapter to find out just how to keep everything in tip top shape with this critical system.

This is a stock photo of a silver 2003 SV1000S. They're pretty bikes, I used to have a blue one and loved it. Great everyday/sport/touring type of bike.

I got this SV1000S to work on, for a customer. So I wanted to show you guys everything I did with it as part of the spring tune-up service I did on it.

The service list included:

-Replace Battery. -Clean + Lubricate Chain. -Clutch Slave Cylinder Clean. -Clutch Fluid Flush. -Brake Fluid Flush. -Brake Pad/Caliper Clean. -Engine Oil + Filter. -Coolant Flush. -Air Filter Inspect + Clean / Replace. -Replace Spark Plugs. -Check/Adjust Valve Tappet Clearance. -Check/Adjust Idle Speed. -Check/Adjust Throttle Cable Free Play. -Check/Adjust Throttle Body Synchronization.

This chapter will show you how to flush the brake fluid in both front and rear brake systems. This is vital for brake performance! With time, the brake fluid picks up moisture and starts to get spongey, the boiling point drops, and your brake system components will start to corrode internally, leading to leaks in the system and poor performance.

This is the rear brake reservoir. The pistons in the caliper were already cleaned as part of the chain service on the bike, then the pistons were pushed into the caliper to force the oil fluid into the reservoir. Now we can pull these 2 screws and remove the reservoir cover.

Unbolt the tank by pulling the two allen head bolts at the front. With the seat removed prop the tank up as shown.

Undo all the air filter cover screws and remove the airbox lid. The screws are captive so they should not get away.

Using compressed air blow out the air filter. Be sure to only blow from the clean side (shown) to the dirty side of the filter.

At this point you can fill the oil back up using the filler on the right hand side of the bike. Watch the level in the sight glass at the bottom of the clutch cover. What I like to do is to fill the bike just past the full mark initially. Then run the motor for a few minutes to let pressure build and fill all voids in the system. Then, and this is very important, let the bike sit for 15 minutes before topping the oil level off! This is a common mistake, people will fill it up right away after running the motor, but the cylinder head is still full of oil which takes time to drain back into the oil pan. This gives you a false reading on the oil level, resulting in overfilling the oil which can lead to a lot of problems.

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ripcurl upvoted

19
Apr 2013
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Brake Fluid Flush

spkr upvoted

ripcurl upvoted

19
Apr 2013

Coolant Flush

19
Apr 2013

Mirror Service

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